Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Y-DNA haplogroup R1a1 and the Kurgan Culture - Associated with the Indoeuropean Expansion ?? - Kurgan and Anatolian Hypothesis of Indoeuropeans

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Y-DNA haplogroup R1a1 and the Kurgan Culture - Associated with the Indoeuropean Expansion ?? - Kurgan and Anatolian Hypothesis of Indoeuropeans


Some excerpts :

Genetics of the Kurgan Culture :

The diversion of Y-chromosome Haplogroup F and its descendants. During the last glacial maximum (25,000 to 13,000 years ago), it is likely that the population of Europe retreated into refuges, one being the Ukraine. A specific haplogroup R1a1 defined by the M17 (SNP marker) of the Y chromosome (see:[3] for nomenclature) is associated by some researchers with the Kurgan culture.

The haplogroup R1a1 is "currently found in central and western Asia, India, and in Slavic populations of Eastern Europe", but it is rare in most countries of Western Europe (e.g. France, or some parts of Great Britain) (see [4] [5]). However, 23.6% of Norwegians, 18.4% of Swedes, 16.5% of Danes, 11% of Saami share this lineage ([6]). Investigations suggest the Hg R1a1 gene expanded from the Dniepr-Don Valley, between 13 000 and 7600 years ago, and was linked to the reindeer hunters of the Ahrensburg culture that started from the Dniepr valley in Ukraine and reached Scandinavia 12 000 years ago.[9]

Ornella Semino et al. (see [7]) propose this postglacial spread of the R1a1 gene from the Ukrainian LGM refuge was magnified by the expansion of the Kurgan culture into Europe and eastward. R1a1 is most prevalent in Poland, Russia, and Ukraine and is also observed in Afghanistan,India,Iran,Pakistan and central Asia.

Correspondingly, R1b (also Eu18 — see [8] for nomenclature conversions) was believed to have spread from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) following the last glacial maximum and is still prevalent in western Europe, or Atlantic Europe, especially in the Basque Country, without being rare in eastern Europe.

Another marker that closely corresponds to Kurgan migrations is distribution of blood group B allele, mapped by Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza. The distribution of blood group B allele in Europe matches the proposed map of Kurgan Culture, and Haplogroup R1a1 (YDNA) distribution.
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1 comment:

  1. Makes sense from linguistic point of view, but I'd go with Oppenheimer on this one, namely Punjab seems a more likely point of origin than Eastern Europe, due to the variety of the haplogroup. Otherwise,my language - Slovenian still has the ancient indoeuropean dual( besides singular and plura)l and many vital words, such as: to live, to die, home, dwelling, mountain etc etc are closer Sanskrit than to English or German or Italian. Makes perfect sense, we have about 40 - 50 percent of Aryan ancestry, only some other eastern Europeans and North Indians have more ancestry from ancient Indo-europeans.

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